Gendering of assistive technology / welfare technology in Norway

“About the Technology that was not Allowed to be a Technology – Discourses on Welfare Technology“
Article by myself and Kari Dyb, available online here: https://doi.org/10.18261/9788215028163-2017-09
It’s in Norwegian though, and the title as well: “Om teknologien som ikke fikk være teknologi – diskurser om velferdsteknologi”.

Abstract: Inspired by Foucault, we explore meaning created by the health authorities’ policy documents on welfare technology. We explore the meaning construction of a «technology-reducing» claim stating that «welfare technology is not about technology, but about human beings». The scientific essay illustrates how this and similar claims have gained widespread acceptance and discusses some of the effects this type of policy statements has for the users of welfare technology.

In the article, we are touching on the (difference in) gendering of health care and technology. Our starting point is critique against a slogan often repeated in Norway: “Welfare technology [assistive tech] is not about technology, but about people”.

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We want more girls in programming classes!

Why are there so few women who choose ICT education in Norway? And how can we change this? One strategy is to start early to include girls in ICT and programming classes. Together with Eid vidaregåande we have received funding from the Norwegian Research Council to work with this challenge. Our project is tied to a national pilot for programming in secondary schools, and our goal is to create inclusive programming education where everybody, also girls, can feel that they belong. We collaborate with schools on all levels at Eid, as well as ICT experts from public and private sector and research institutions, and of course the pupils, to create an inclusive environment for programming. Our goal is to reflect how programming and ICT are both relevant and important in many different contexts, and also to present a large variety of ICT experts or “role models” in all kinds and shapes, illustrating that anybody can programme.

Here we are signing the collaboration agreement, the three headmasters and myself.
Signing the agreement about collaboration (Photo Ove Jonny Lillestøl)

CFP – HCC13: This Changes Everything

CFP for the 13th IFIP TC9 Human Choice and Computers Conference: “This Changes Everything”, to be held in Poznan, Poland, 19th-21st September 2018
Conference Chairs: David Kreps, Kai Kimppa, Louise Leenen, Charles Ess

Gender is of course a relevant topic in general for a conference like this, but there is also a track on “Gender in ICT” (Track chairs: Sisse Finken, Christina Mörtberg and Johanna Sefyrin), connected to the (sleeping)  working group (WG9.8) on Gender, Diversity and ICT.

Send your full paper before January 15, and perhaps we can revive the sleeping WG9.8 together 🙂

This conference will also be part of the 24th IFIP World Computer Congress!
 

 

Source: Call For Papers – HCC13: This Changes Everything

“Increasing Number of Women in Computing Hinges on Changes in Culture, Not Curriculum”

Carol Frieze (left) and Jeria Quesenberry – Photo www.cmu.edu

Fewer women than men pursue computer science, but correcting that imbalance won’t be accomplished via quick fixes or by making coursework less strenuous. Rather, the culture of computer science departments must change, as outlined in a new book, “Kicking Butt in Computer Science: Women in Computing at Carnegie Mellon University.

Source: Increasing Number of Women in Computing Hinges on Changes in Culture, Not Curriculum

“start by empowering a girl you know”

8 ways you can empower girls to learn coding

1. Know the specific barriers we need to overcome.
2. Start with concrete first steps in your own life.

The lack of women and girls in computer science is a well-documented problem. Now it’s time for the average person to finally do something about it.

Addressing the issue of girls and coding in your community doesn’t require you to start your own nonprofit or advocacy organization. In fact, you can start very small, like choosing to empower a girl you know.

3. Find organizations putting in the work already.
4. Be a role model.
5. Encourage your local school to teach girls how to code.
6. Lead a coding club for girls.
7. Recognize that computer science is an intersectional issue.
8. Understand where girls need to begin, too.

Source: 8 ways you can empower girls to learn coding

“Håper Rey i Star Wars kan få flere jenter til å like realfag”

Verden trenger flere kvinner i ingeniørfag, matematikk og naturvitenskapelige fag, og NASA håper filmer som Star Wars kan bidra. – Vi vet ikke om den nye Einstein vil være en kvinne eller mann, påpeker NASAs forskningssjef Ellen Stofan.

Source: Håper Rey i Star Wars kan få flere jenter til å like realfag

Code School for children and heads of state – Reaktor

Encouraged by the positive feedback from the participants, we agreed that all children should get the chance to try out the basics of programming in a fun, tangible way. Word of a public code club spread through word of mouth and social media, and the registration for the first Code School filled up within an hour. Over 300 children were placed on a waiting list.

“BUT how can we get boys and girls excited about coding?” they ask in the video. By drawing with code!


Code School from Reaktor on Vimeo.

Source: Code School for children and heads of state – Reaktor

“Girls Who Code to give $1 million to underprivileged girls”


Nonprofit Girls Who Code is giving away scholarships to low-income girls who want to take their free summer coding classes. Here’s why.

Roughly 1% of girls study computer science — and just 20% of software developers are women. So Girls Who Code alumni have the potential to add a big influx of women into the STEM pipeline.

Source: Girls Who Code to give $1 million to underprivileged girls – Jan. 19, 2016